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In early 2014 researchers have recorded a Cuvier’s Beaked Whale diving for over two hours into the depths of just under 3000 meters (nearly two miles) below the ocean surface, which represents both the deepest and the longest dive ever documented for any marine mammal.

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Cephalopods are incredibly evolved creatures: The Giant Squid has three hearts that pump blue blood. Food travels through its brain before reaching the stomach and they utilise floating bones to detect gravitation for orientation in the dark.

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Turritopsis Nutricula is a species of Jellyfish that can age backwards.

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Seahorses have a 90 percent success rate when attacking prey, which makes them one of the most successful predators in the ocean.

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Sand Tiger Sharks are the only sharks known to come to the surface and gulp air. They store the air in their stomachs, which allows them to float motionless in the water while hunting.

Sand Tiger Shark   © Mark Fox

This Shark is not related to the Tiger Shark (Galeocerdo cuvier) however, it is a cousin of the Great White Shark (Carcharodon carcharias).
Despite its fearsome appearance and strong swimming ability, it is a relatively docile and slow-moving shark that will only attack a human when threatened.

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The Christmas Frigatebird is a highly endangered species of sea bird that only breeds on Christmas Island in the Indian Ocean.

Male Christmas Frigatebird   © Save Nature Save Human

Male Christmas Frigatebirds begin their mating displays in late December, inflating their scarlet throat pouches during courtship.

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Unlike most fishes, the Australian Lungfish has the unique ability to breathe air using a single lung.

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Pygmy Geckos have water repelling skin that allows them to walk on water.

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Giant Clams are colourful creatures that have hundreds of simple eyes along the edges of their mantle.

The Tridacnid’s eyes are visible as dark spots along the mantle

The largest species of Giant Clam, the Tridacna, are the largest bivalves ever to have existed in the fossil record.
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Cuttlefish are known as masters of camouflage because they can change skin colours and textures in an instant to blend into the surrounding environment. They do it so well, it is almost impossible to believe that these animals themselves are colour-blind.


Kings of Camouflage   © Civil Digital

Cephalopods have huge eyes, and much of their brain is dedicated to processing visual information. They use this information to control their disguises through a dense network of nerves running from the brain to the skin.
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